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In this article, I’ll try to cover the more “desirable” Marshall amps that were built since 1962 up to the JCM800 series, wich most consider to be the “last” great Marshalls produced (That until Marshall released the Vintage Modern series. I will also try to give examples of where they were used.. I hope you like it These are just a few of the thousands of codes that Marshall came up with for their amps. There were many cosmetic changes on the first years until it finally got the “Classic Marshall Look” by 1964.I won’t write the rest because it may confuse you even more. It’s important to note that, for example, a 1959 amp has nothing to do with the The JTM-45 JTM-45 with “block” logo The first Marshall ever made. The front panel has “Presence”, “Bass”, “Middle” and “Treble” controls, as well as 2 volumes and 4 inputs.While all those changes happened, new models started being developed to expand Marshall’s catalog.Here are some of them: Marshall Bass and Super Bass Back of a Marshall Super Bass The Marshall Bass 50w #1986 and the Marshall Super Bass 100w #1992 appeared after the change to the EL-34 tubes. These amps were not only stupidly loud, but also really really clean.But Fil’s Metro is a reproduction of this very same amp, so you might be familiar with it by now.Please note the “Black Flag” JTM marking that was used at that time.

Eric Clapton used a JTM-45 combo on the legendary (Now you know why this amp was called “Bluesbreaker” : P) He used his Les Paul through the Normal Channel of the amp. The then “horrible” distorted and saturated sound turned into what we know today as the “rock tone” (maybe not yet… Another example of this amp can be heard on AC/DC’s This is a confusing era, with lots of changes and new models. 😛 The transitition from the JTM to the JMP amps happened, in my view, with three steps.

The JTM-100, now with four EL-34s too, also gained a proper 100w transformer. It was called Marshall Super Lead 100w #1959 (Although they still didn’t have the “JMP” mark on the front, In my view, this amps are already into the JMP territory, because they have all of the JMP characteristics). This early “Plexi” versions (up to 1968) are really articulate and have a real nice “roar”.

This is a photo of a JTM-45/100, but it’s the same headbox used for the early Super Leads Back of a Marshall Super Lead I think you are all familiar with this amp. If you want to hear this amp, listen to any Free live performance.

If you don’t have much experience (myself included, to be honest : P), I recommend asking help from the members here of the community.

Post a link of the desired amp on the “Ebay Watch Post”, so we can help analyzing it. I’ll concentrate on “how they sound”, “how they look like” and also “how to tell them apart”. It was made as a head and as a combo (known as the “Bluesbreaker” combo).

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